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Epic Miami Peacock Fishing with Hai Truong by Jan Maizler

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Adventures Out of Island Inn Sanibel By Jan Maizler

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Adventures Out of the Island Inn Sanibel

 

By

 

Jan Maizler

 

 

While I’ve traveled the better part of the globe in pursuit of piscatorial pleasures, Sanibel Island on Florida’s West Coast has drawn me back decade after decade. My first criterion for angling travel is excellent fishing and Sanibel satisfies that need with some of the best snook fishing in the world. There are also abundant populations of redfish and seatrout year-round plus seasonal tarpon, kingfish, mackerel, and false albacore migrations. Whether in the Sanibel backcountry or the Gulf of Mexico, there is always something ready to pounce on your fly, lure, or bait.

 

The precious comparative rarity that Sanibel offers is superb fishing along its beaches. If your destination has the Gulf as a backyard- as does the Island Inn- all you need to do is walk from your room across the sand dunes and start casting at the water’s edge.

I have used the Island Inn for years. Its wonderful rooms, amenities, and restaurant sit on a very snookish stretch of shell-blessed beach.

 

And from late spring until late summer when the gulf is at its calmest, you can expect to see and present a fly or lure to snook after snook crossing right at the water’s edge. This fishing is especially excellent on the incoming tide up through high slack. You can also catch mackerel, seatrout, pompano, redfish and even tarpon right from the beach. There’s a great deal to do all around you when you beach fish. You can gather some fine shells, sit down and have a picnic on blanket and sand, take some pictures, or shed some gear and go for a swim.

 

My fishing format when I stay at Island Inn includes sightfishing and blind casting the beaches and also fishing with a guide in the abundant backcountry. The guide I use most often is Captain Mike Smith (239-573-FISH). I start my day of beach fishing at dawn by casting to minnow “sprays” and/or diving birds since the sun is not high enough to sight fish. After a couple hours, I’ll enjoy a delicious complementary breakfast at the Inn’s Traditions restaurant. After the repast, I’ll either return to the beach for actual sight fishing with a better-positioned sun or I’ll meet Mike at the Punta Rassa boat ramp. My arrival this time was preceded by a week of southerly winds, leaving a roiled and muddy Gulf.  Sight casting for snook would be impossible for the next two days I had allotted for fishing. Although I could have used rattling plugs with applied attractant and probably caught snook, I turned my attention to writing projects and fishing the flats with Mike.

 

Day One-

 

Trips that become stories are most satisfying when they ooze success. We’d be fishing windy conditions and I wanted pictures, so I was quite willing to use the most successful methods- which in this region is “whitebait” (A.K.A. live scaled sardines). The heat of June is not an easy time to get loads of properly sized whitebaits, but Mike had netted a sufficient number of them.

 

This day was pleasantly more challenging for me since we did not use “chummers”, but instead relied on my spot casting an individual bait –like a lure- to shadowy pockets alongside and under the mangroves. In the five hours that we fished, I released around forty snook to six pounds, lost just as many, and had plenty of missed strikes. In addition, we hooked and released three nice redfish.

 

Midday thunderstorms started forming. We could see the sheets of rain falling out of the clouds flat, blackened “bellies”. The first flash of lighting touched the water a few miles away, telling us it was time to go. On the way back to the boat ramp, I reflected on the astonishingly large biomass of young snook in the area.

 

Day Two-

 

On the second day of fishing, Island Inn’s General Manager Chris Davison joined us. Once we came aboard, Mike pointed his Lake and Bay towards the deep reaches of Pine Island Sound. During the run of about forty minutes, Mike mentioned he wanted for us to have a change of pace.

 

Today, Mike had loads of whitebait but they were somewhat small. We were able to make good casts with Mike’s Temple Fork Outfitters rods and Daiwa spinning reels filled with light braid. Chris was the first to bend a rod with a nice redfish. The skies above were clear and the sun beamed loads of heat into the morning water. The effect of this was that we’d have to try multiple spots as the fish were not bunched up like on colder days with low water. Chris caught a few more snook while I caught a large redfish, a flounder and two small snook.

 

We were able to get the photos I needed so we called it a day. Of equal importance was the afternoon of fun I had planned at the Inn.

 

 

 

CONTACT DATA-

Island Inn Sanibel

3111 West Gulf Drive, Sanibel, Florida 33957

Phone: 239-472-1561

www.islandinnsanibel.com

 

Captain Mike Smith- Mangrove Island Charters

Phone: 239-573-FISH

www.mangroveislandcharters.com

Access Closure in Biscayne National Park

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Those keeping an eye on General Management Plan changes coming to Biscayne National Park have foreseen this coming.  The current GMP reflects on enforcing areas like the Featherbeds and Jones Lagoon No Motor Zones (my only question is whether these are no entry with a motor on your transom or you may enter and pole as with pole/troll zones) as well as making many areas near the west side of the bay idle zones.  There is a stretch of reef just offshore of Elliot Key that will be made Marine Reserve Zones (my take on this is no fishing, no access for fisherman).

I attended a conference call set up by the ASA (American Sportfishing Association) this afternoon to listen in on where some of the folks in our industry stand on the GMP closures proposed in Biscayne National Park.  I especially noted the statements made by representatives from both Navionics and Florida Sportsman Magazine.

Points discussed I noted most:

1.  Navionics made a statement asking the ASA to become more proactive rather then reactive.

2.  Florida Sportsman Magazine representatives touched on the fact that there may be a commercial benefiting aspect to the closure biased to favor those in the diving/snorkeling industry.  This closure would not benefit recreational anglers but the recreational divers (not spearfishers) could ultimately see this benefiting them.  Was there somebody on that side lobbying to get the closure?

3.  ASA pushes those imposing the new GMP to show us supporting science to prove how the closures will be effective (currently there is a lack of science to support this effort’s success).

Either argument you present, no matter which side you stand on and whether you are pro or against the imminent changes coming to our Biscayne Bay, it is happening.  Several questions arise in my mind.  I wonder if National park service has planned more stringent and more present enforcement for these new laws.  Will this truly be beneficial?  Is this the start of even more proposed closures to come?  These are points we need to consider.

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